evepostappleOnce upon a time, there was a woman named Eve, who, unable to resist the luring temptation of a fragrant orchard, took a bite of forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge. Perhaps Eve was bored. Perhaps she was ovulating and had a desperate craving for something sweet. Perhaps life in the little garden was becoming stressful or claustrophobic. Perhaps she felt out of control or lacked passion in her life and in order to numb her emotions or soothe herself from Adam's lack of attention or his ambivalence in starting a family, she chose to indulge. Perhaps Eve was an emotional eater. But as Eve soon discovered, neither the bite, nor the whole fruit fulfilled her as she had hoped. Not only did she realize she was naked but that she had contempt for the way she looked. Perhaps Eve suffered with body dismorphia. Eve tried to stop eating the forbidden fruit and eventually avoided eating altogether but that didn't work and she ended up eating until she could no longer breathe. The point of this is that Eve lost her intuitive ability to nourish herself. She no longer had balance in her life and was willing to do any and everything to get that back.

Maybe Eve didn't exist. Maybe the stories that were told are not as important as the stories we tell ourselves.

This blog is dedicated to creating new stories based on the philosophies of whole body nutrition, self-love, intuition, fitness and yoga.

In my journey I have sought to uncover the knowledge and balance which have brought me to a greater awareness of health and this is what I wish to share with you.

About Me

I am a holistic nutritionist, certified yoga instructor, athlete, healthy living chef, and published writer. I have spent the last four years of my life rebuilding all aspects of myself after recovering from an eating disorder. Follow me as I continue to eat clean, train hard, and discover balance mind, body and spirit. zainsaraswatijamal.com

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    Asana Of The Week: Bakasana - Crane Pose
This pose is often referred to as Crow Pose, either way, it is a pose that opens the powerful root chakra energy center and is, therefore, a wonderful pose to ground and center.
Bakasana develops wrist, arm and core strength whilst releasing the muscles of the upper back and groin. This is also a very beneficial asana to heal the digestive system and ensure that it is toned and functioning optimally.
It is best to avoid this pose if you suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome.
The most challenging aspect of this pose is gathering the strength from the core to lift the weight of the legs and this is accomplished by drawing in with mula and udiyana bandha creating an upward momentum of energy.
For me, the most important aspect of holding Bakasana lays in the breath.  It is not about getting into the shape but rather using the breath to open the body and ultimately release what the body needs to release within the context of the shape.  With slow, controlled breath, the body will sustain a parasympathetic response, thus calming it and helping it to strengthen.
Step by Step
(from yogajournal.com)
Squat down from Tadasana with your inner feet a few inches apart. If it isn’t possible to keep your heels on the floor, support them on a thickly folded blanket. Separate your knees wider than your hips and lean the torso forward, between the inner thighs. Stretch your arms forward, then bend your elbows, place your hands on the floor and the backs of the upper arms against the shins.
Snuggle your inner thighs against the sides of your torso, and your shins into your armpits, and slide the upper arms down as low onto the shins as possible. Lift up onto the balls of your feet and lean forward even more, taking the weight of your torso onto the backs of the upper arms. In Bakasana you consciously attempt to contract your front torso and round your back completely. To help yourself do this, keep your tailbone as close to your heels as possible.
With an exhalation, lean forward even more onto the backs of your upper arms, to the point where the balls of your feet leave the floor. Now your torso and legs are balanced on the backs of your upper arms. As a beginner at this pose, you might want to stop here, perched securely on the bent arms.
But if you are ready to go further, squeeze the legs against the arms, press the inner hands firmly to the floor and (with an inhalation) straighten the elbows. Seen from the side the arms are angled slightly forward relative to the floor. The inner knees should be glued to the outer arms, high up near the armpits. Keep the head in a neutral position with your eyes looking at the floor, or lift the head slightly, without compressing the back of the neck, and look forward.
Stay in the pose anywhere from 20 seconds to 1 minute. To release, exhale and slowly lower your feet to the floor, back into a squat.

    Asana Of The Week: Bakasana - Crane Pose

    This pose is often referred to as Crow Pose, either way, it is a pose that opens the powerful root chakra energy center and is, therefore, a wonderful pose to ground and center.

    Bakasana develops wrist, arm and core strength whilst releasing the muscles of the upper back and groin. This is also a very beneficial asana to heal the digestive system and ensure that it is toned and functioning optimally.

    It is best to avoid this pose if you suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome.

    The most challenging aspect of this pose is gathering the strength from the core to lift the weight of the legs and this is accomplished by drawing in with mula and udiyana bandha creating an upward momentum of energy.

    For me, the most important aspect of holding Bakasana lays in the breath.  It is not about getting into the shape but rather using the breath to open the body and ultimately release what the body needs to release within the context of the shape.  With slow, controlled breath, the body will sustain a parasympathetic response, thus calming it and helping it to strengthen.

    Step by Step

    (from yogajournal.com)

    Squat down from Tadasana with your inner feet a few inches apart. If it isn’t possible to keep your heels on the floor, support them on a thickly folded blanket. Separate your knees wider than your hips and lean the torso forward, between the inner thighs. Stretch your arms forward, then bend your elbows, place your hands on the floor and the backs of the upper arms against the shins.

    Snuggle your inner thighs against the sides of your torso, and your shins into your armpits, and slide the upper arms down as low onto the shins as possible. Lift up onto the balls of your feet and lean forward even more, taking the weight of your torso onto the backs of the upper arms. In Bakasana you consciously attempt to contract your front torso and round your back completely. To help yourself do this, keep your tailbone as close to your heels as possible.

    With an exhalation, lean forward even more onto the backs of your upper arms, to the point where the balls of your feet leave the floor. Now your torso and legs are balanced on the backs of your upper arms. As a beginner at this pose, you might want to stop here, perched securely on the bent arms.

    But if you are ready to go further, squeeze the legs against the arms, press the inner hands firmly to the floor and (with an inhalation) straighten the elbows. Seen from the side the arms are angled slightly forward relative to the floor. The inner knees should be glued to the outer arms, high up near the armpits. Keep the head in a neutral position with your eyes looking at the floor, or lift the head slightly, without compressing the back of the neck, and look forward.

    Stay in the pose anywhere from 20 seconds to 1 minute. To release, exhale and slowly lower your feet to the floor, back into a squat.

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      My goal by the end of the summer is to be able to hold bakasana for at least 30 seconds. Was able to hold it for maybe 4...
    11. beautythroughbalance said: awesome!
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